Geometric shapes are everywhere. No matter where you look, almost everything is made up of both two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) geometric shapes. Keep reading for real-life geometric shape bsci-ch.org that make up the world around us.




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Circle bsci-ch.org

A circle is a round shape with the same radius from a fixed point in the center. bsci-ch.org of circles in real life include:

pizza piescookieswheels of a bikeclock facesdinner plates

Square bsci-ch.org

Four equal straight sides with four right angles make a square. Some real-life bsci-ch.org of squares are:

square rubber stampssquare tiles on the floorsquare paper napkinschess boardsvirtual keyboard keys

Triangle bsci-ch.org

Triangles are three-sided figures with straight sides. There are lots of different types of triangles, depending on their angles. bsci-ch.org of triangles in real life are:

slices of pizzaa sandwich cut diagonallysome tortilla chipssails on a boatyield traffic signs

Rectangle bsci-ch.org

Like a square, a rectangle has four straight sides with four right angles. However, two sides are shorter than the other two sides. Check out these bsci-ch.org of real-life rectangles:

chapter book coverscell phonessome picture framesdollar billssome ice cream sandwiches

Pentagon bsci-ch.org

Pentagons are shapes with five sides of equal length. They are less common than quadrilaterals, which have four sides, but can still be found in real life. Some bsci-ch.org of pentagons are:

The Pentagon buildingblack sections on soccer ballshome plate in baseballtraffic crossing signs

Hexagon bsci-ch.org

When you add one side to a pentagon, you get a hexagon. A hexagon has six straight sides of equal length. Check out these bsci-ch.org of real-life hexagons:

ice crystalssnowflakesbeehive cellsoutline of a metal nutwhite sections on soccer balls

Octagon bsci-ch.org

Eight straight sides, typically of equal length, make an octagon. They are more common in real life than you may think. Some bsci-ch.org of octagons are:

stop signsopen umbrellasUFC ringpoker tables

Trapezoid bsci-ch.org

A trapezoid is a four-sided figure with just one pair of parallel sides. You can find trapezoids in the following bsci-ch.org:

the trusses on bridgessome handbag sidesa half-eaten piece of pizza
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bsci-ch.org of 3D Geometric Shapes

Unlike two-dimensional shapes, three-dimensional shapes have width, height and depth. bsci-ch.org of 3D shapes include pyramids, spheres and cubes. Take a look at these everyday 3D geometric shape bsci-ch.org.

Some of these shapes are interchangeable, of course. For example, a bag might not always be a parallelogram, as there are certainly circular bags and other types possible. This list is also not exhaustive either, as there are many other two-dimensional and three-dimensional geometric shapes.

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Sphere bsci-ch.org

Spheres are round solid figures. Like circles, they have a radius in the center that is equidistant to every point on the sphere. However, unlike circles, they have volume and depth. bsci-ch.org of real-life spheres are:

basketballsorangesmarblestennis balls

Cube bsci-ch.org

Each of the six faces of a cube is a square. When they are put together in a 3D cube shape, also known as a square prism, they create depth. Some bsci-ch.org of cubes include:

six-sided dicesugar cubessquare building blocksRubix cubessquare packing boxes

Cone bsci-ch.org

A cone has a circular base that tapers to one point. Cones are very common in everyday items, including:

traffic coneswaffle ice cream conesparty hatsChristmas treesfunnels

Cylinder bsci-ch.org

Cylinders are three-dimensional figures with parallel sides and a circular cross-section. Some real-life bsci-ch.org of cylinders are:

cardboard paper towel tubestraight pipesdrinking glasseschapstick tubescans

Ellipsoid bsci-ch.org

An ellipsoid is a sphere that is not perfectly round because it has been flattened at two sides. Also known as a spheroid, an ellipsoid creates a 3D oval effect. Some bsci-ch.org of ellipsoids are:

footballseggssome of Saturn"s satellite moons (Mimas, Enceladus, Tethys)

Rectangular Prism bsci-ch.org

A rectangular prism is a 3D figure where one pair of opposite sides are the same shape, connected by straight, parallel sides. They have four rectangular faces and two square faces. You can find rectangular prisms in these bsci-ch.org:

sticks of butterbrickscamerascereal boxesrectangular packing boxes

Triangular Prism

Triangular prisms are just like rectangular prisms, except that their square faces are triangles, making them three-sided prisms. bsci-ch.org of real-life triangular prisms include:

tentswedges of watermelonwedges of cheeseslices of cake


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Pyramid bsci-ch.org

A three-dimensional figure with one flat side and edges emerging to come together at a point is a pyramid. They can have any shape with three or more sides as their base, including a triangle (triangular pyramid), square (square pyramid) and pentagon (pentagonal pyramid). bsci-ch.org include:

the Great Pyramid of Gizathe roof of a housesome free-standing cheese gratersglass Lourve Pyramid
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Shapes That Build Our World

The world around us is built out of 2D and 3D shapes. Having a basic understanding of geometric shapes and where they can be found in everyday life is a great start to a mathematical education. For more mathematical practice, check out these basic math terms to get you started. You can also take a look at some bsci-ch.org of monomials and polynomials if you"re ready to move on to algebraic concepts.